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Grayson Mallet-Prevost

Grayson Mallet-Prevost

The proximity of Camden to Philadelphia has had mixed results throughout Camden’s history, but one benefit to the close proximity between the cities is the range of occupants that made Camden their home. The family of Grayson Mallet-Prevost may have only lived in Camden for a duration of three years, but they give an international flair to the history of the Cooper Street Historic District and can show how easy people made the transition between living in Philadelphia and Camden in the late nineteenth century.

Grayson Mallet-Prevost was born somewhere within Philadelphia in 1823 and was born into a military family. Grayson’s father, Andrew Mallet-Prevost served as a Brigadier-General in the War of 1812, and Grayson’s older brother Charles Mallet-Prevost had a long military career that cumulated in a position as a Brigadier-General in the Civil War. Grayson’s service in the military was as a field surgeon and he only participated in one major conflict, the Mexican-American War (1846-48). Grayson started his military medical career in 1844, after completing a program at the Medical Institute of Philadelphia. He took a number of exams for the Army Medical Board, and placed second out of eleven applicants. However, the military only had one opening, forcing Grayson to work as a surgeon at West Point and work with civilians in Alabama until his placement in the army in March of 1846. Grayson worked for the Seventh Infantry Regiment for the entirety of the Mexican American War. After 1848, Grayson started to practice as a civilian surgeon and frequently traveled from Philadelphia to Mexico. In the 1870’s, Grayson was on the Medical Board for the Presbyterian Medical Center in Philadelphia; which meant he and his family stayed within the Philadelphia area until his retirement from the board in 1881.

Grayson Mallet-Prevost

Grayson Mallet-Prevost met his wife, Marionita Cosio, in the city of Parras, Mexico in 1849. Marionita Cosio was born in 1835 and was the daughter of the Governor of Zacatecas, Don Severo Cosio. After Grayson and Marionita were married in 1850, they moved to Zacatecas, where Grayson continued to work as a civilian doctor and surgeon. Seven of their eight children were born in Mexico and they traveled with their parents to the United States. Eight of Grayson’s children were living with him while he was living at 312 Cooper Street between the years 1878-1880. His seven daughters, Isabel (Age 23), Virginia (21), Andrea (22), Washington (16), Meme (14), Paquitu (11), Beatrice (1) and his son Severo (19) were all listed as single, and only Beatrice was listed as being born in the United States. A family of this size, living on Cooper Street typically had a domestic servant, and the Mallet-Prevost family had Catharine Gallin, a twenty-seven year old Irish immigrant who lived in Philadelphia.

This passport from 1869 shows what passports looked like in the 19th Century, gives some physical characteristics for Grayson Mallet-Prevost, and shows three of his daughters traveling with him.

This passport from 1869 shows what passports looked like in the 19th Century, gives some physical characteristics for Grayson Mallet-Prevost, and shows three of his daughters traveling with him.

The movements of the Mallet-Prevost family can demonstrate the connection and ease of travel between Camden and Philadelphia in the late nineteenth century while Grayson served on the Medical Board of the Presbyterian Medical Center. The Mallet-Prevost family moved frequently between 1871-1881. First, they moved to South 15th Street in Philadelphia in 1871, Spruce Street in Philadelphia in 1873, Walnut Street in Philadelphia in 1877, 312 Cooper Street in Camden in 1878, and finally Pine Street in Philadelphia in 1881. The relatively close proximity of Cooper Street to the ferries to Philadelphia may have been one choice for the Mallet-Prevost family to move across the Delaware River for three years. Grayson Mallet-Prevost is just one example among many who made the choice to make Camden their home while their work was in Philadelphia.

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